Totality: Solar eclipse 2024 photos from across Central Ohio

0
88

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The total solar eclipse only lasted a few brief moments, but in that time, many were able to capture the moon perfectly lined up with the sun. Before and after that, the partial eclipse could be seen.

If you missed the eclipse or want to revisit the solar event, check out these photos capturing the once-in-a-lifetime event.

Anusha Krishnaswamy, 11, of Dublin, relaxes during the eclipse at Eljer Park in Marysville. She was at the eclipse with her parents Prabhat and Mangala Krishnaswamy.

PHOTOS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

The first location in continental North America to experience totality: Mexico’s Pacific coast, around 2 p.m. The eclipse exits continental North America on the Atlantic coast of Canada less than two hours later.

An estimated 44 million people live within the path of totality, with another couple hundred million within 200 miles, guaranteeing the continent’s biggest eclipse crowd ever.

Jake Elmer is thrilled watching the eclipse with his daughter Riley during the eclipse at Eljer Park in Marysville. The Elmer's came from Philadelphia for the eclipse.

The event has been talked about for years now, as the last time Ohio saw a partial eclipse was in 2017 and the last time it saw a total eclipse was in 1806, just three years into Ohio’s statehood. The next time a total eclipse will move through the state will be 2099.

VIEWING PARTIES IN OHIO

Ohio expected thousands of new visitors, all stopping by for a chance to see the moon fully cover the sun for a few brief moments during totality.

Crowds began gathering as early as Monday morning in areas along the path of totality.

Annette Cook smiles during the eclipse at Eljer Park in Marysville. Cook, from North Carolina, was watching the eclipse with her husband John and son Chris Cook.
Brothers Lucas, left, and Aiden Marzan try out their eclipse glasses while waiting in Eljer Park in Marysville for the start of the eclipse on Monday April 8th.
At 2:56 p.m., it was noticeably cooler as people looked up to see the sun disappearing at Glacier Ridge Metro Park.